‘Hagazussa: A Heathen’s Curse’ is one of 2019’s first horror masterworks

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Aleksandra Cwen in Hagazussa (Courtesy of Doppelganger Releasing)

Coming off 2018– a highly sociopolitical year that contained multiple depictions of witches, femininity, and black magic within horror through the likes of Suspiria, Pyewacket, and Chilling Adventures of Sabrina– Lukas Feigelfeld’s debut feature film Hagazussa: A Heathen’s Curse, which has been circulating the festivals since fall 2017, will finally be available to audiences this month.  And although a slightly different take on witches than we’ve been seeing as of late, Hagazussa is arguably the most subtly gut-wrenching.

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Interview with ‘Hagazussa’ writer/director Lukas Feigelfeld

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(Doppelgänger Releasing)

I had the opportunity to speak with Hagazussa: A Heathen’s Curse writer/director Lukas Feigelfeld about his highly anticipated feature film debut, his transition into filmmaking, his visual style, Pagan folklore, comparisons to The Witch, “elevated” horror, and his sympathy for female witches.  (You can read my review for Hagazussa here.)

The film’s synopsis, according to its Doppelgänger Releasing site page:

In a remote Alpine village in the 15th century, the orphan Albrun grows up to become a marked woman.  The scapegoat of ancient superstitions and monstrous misogyny, this self-styled witch begins to assert her otherworldly birthright.  The plague she conjures makes human cruelty look pathetic and small by comparison.  This atmospheric debut feature from Lukas Feigelfeld is a haunting Pagan death trip and a startling vision of psychedelic horror.

Bloody Disgusting and Doppelgänger Releasing presents Hagazussa: A Heathen’s Curse, opening in limited theaters on April 19, and will be available on VOD, DVD, and Blu-ray on April 23.

Read on for our conversation. (Special thanks to Bloody Disgusting and Margarita Cortes.)

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The VVitch: slow, but worth the fiery climax 😈🔥

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Image owned by A24 Films

I’m about a year-and-a-half late to the party, but Robert Eggers’s The Witch, (stylized as The VVitch) is a sloooooow burn, but rewards those who stick it out until the awesome, blazing climax.  The Witch stars Ana Taylor-Joy, Ralph Ineson, and Kate Dickie as an ostracized Puritan family, set in the richly historic 17th century New England (yes, around the Salem Witch trials period).  Tensions arise, and this deeply religious family reaches closer and closer to the brink of falling apart. Continue reading

Raw review: Sex, Eating Flesh, & Coming-of-Age art-horror

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Garance Marillier in Raw (Petit Film)

As much as a small part of me cringes when I hear a new horror film being described as an “art horror” (a little pretentious), I usually tend to agree that these films- including The Babadook and It Follows- are pretty damn good pieces of cinema.  2016’s Raw is no different.  I’ve been searching for Raw for some time now, and since its recent release on Netflix, I finally got a chance to see what all the fuss was about myself… Continue reading