How Ari Aster Embraces Horror Conventions to Create His Own Unique Contributions to the Genre (Originally Published for Bloody Disgusting)

0

The original article can be found at Bloody-Disgusting.com.

img_5520

This decade gifted us a plethora of auteur filmmakers that brought something completely fresh to the horror genre, while still managing to derive influence from beloved classics of the past— Jennifer Kent, Issa Lopez, Robert Eggers, Jordan Peele— to name a few. But there’s one creator in particular who has excited myself and many others to next-level degrees with his assuredly eccentric, provocative, ballsy filmmaking style: Ari Aster.   

Continue reading

TIGERS ARE NOT AFRAID and the Justified Inclusion of Child Violence within Horror Films (Originally Published for Bloody-Disgusting.com)

0

img_3890

(Original post can be found at Bloody-Disgusting.com. This editorial contains spoilers for Tigers Are Not AfraidIt Chapter TwoThe Nightingale, and The House That Jack Built.)

Issa Lopez’s poignant and revelatory Tigers Are Not Afraid has made such an impact on the horror genre because it differs from so many others films that are given to us: its narrative is told through perspectives that we never see enough of in mainstream cinema; its fantastical elements often add to the film’s sense of peril, as opposed to solely bringing the characters comfort; and, most interestingly, it contains a fearlessness to incorporate grim (but necessary) portrayals of child violence into its storytelling.

Continue reading

TINGLE MONSTERS is much more than the first-ever ASMR horror film (Originally published for Nightmarish Conjurings)

0

The original post can be found at NightmarishConjurings.com under “Reviews.”

img_3796

The first-ever ASMR horror film, aptly titled TINGLE MONSTERS, is upon us— but this effective 10-minute short film from writer/director/star Alexandra Serio has much more on its mind than auditory relaxation triggers.

Continue reading

Before we had MIDSOMMAR, we had The Wicker Man (1973)

0
img_2786

Christopher Lee in The Wicker Man

The original post can be found here.

For those of us who were lucky enough to catch Midsommar already, we noticed that Ari Aster’s sophomore psychedelic, folk horror film derives an incredible amount of influence from Robin Hardy’s 1973 masterpiece, THE WICKER MAN.  Everything from its (seemingly) warm, welcoming commune members, to its commentary on intrusive outsiders barging in on dissimilar cultures, to its fiery third act (which I won’t discuss here) Midsommar is indebted to this folk horror classic, and we thought we would swing around the maypole again and remind you why this film is so integral to the horror genre. Continue reading

MIDSOMMAR solidifies Ari Aster as a contemporary master of bizarro horror

1

img_2553

There is a handful of contemporary auteur filmmakers that are bringing something completely fresh to the horror genre, while still managing to derive influence from classics of the past– Jennifer Kent, Robert Eggers, Jordan Peele– to name a few.  But none have excited me quite to the degree of the eccentric, strange, provocative, ballsy filmmaking style that Hereditary (and now Midsommar) creator Ari Aster possesses.

Continue reading

In Fabric Review- Overlook Film Festival (originally published for NightmarishingConjurings.com)

0

The original post can be found here.

img_2274

Kill, couture, kill!  You’ve got an evil-spirited dress wreaking havoc upon all those who encounter it, pitch-black humor about consumerism, demented kill scenes, Peter Strickland’s direction, and an A24 distribution.  IN FABRIC is the British horror-comedy that we didn’t know we needed.

Continue reading

What I’ve watched lately: ‘I Trapped The Devil’, ‘A Tale of Two Sisters’, ‘The Autopsy of Jane Doe’, ‘A Ghost Story’, ‘The Killing of a Sacred Deer’, ‘The Innocents’

0
img_1569

Still from The Killing of a Sacred Deer (A24)

Let’s catch up: Behold a list of (mostly) fantastic films I have watched recently.  (Embarrassed to admit that many of these were a first time watch– SO late to the party.)  Regardless– even though each and every one of these deserves an individual, in-depth, analytical review– for the sake of time, I’ll sound off some quick thoughts about each film, and why you should catch up with these jewels (or yell at me because I hadn’t seen many of these until recently.)

Continue reading

A24’s space thriller ‘High Life’ is a wonderfully weird, challenging look at humanity

0
img_1268

Robert Pattinson in High Life (A24)

“Break the laws of nature– you’ll pay for it.”

In Claire Denis’s newest arthouse film High Life, Robert Pattinson’s Monte whispers this statement to himself, since only he and his baby girl remain on a coasting space ship, with no other (living) crew members.

Sure, the study of humanity– in the broadest spectrum– has been depicted to death within films that take place in outer space.  Isolation, loneliness, violence, and goal-oriented manipulation are common themes we’ve witnessed in space films before, and High Life is no different.  But I guarantee that you have never seen a space film quite like this one.

Continue reading

‘The House That Jack Built’ Director’s Cut is mean-spirited, misogynistic, and tough to watch…but still shamefully enjoyable

1

img_1009Last spring during Cannes Film Festival, you may have read about the 100 or so people who walked out during the latest “gruesome” Lars Von Trier film, The House That Jack Built— resulting in conflicting reviews such as, “Von Trier went too far,” while others proclaiming it as his “best film to date.”  Nothing new for the controversial Von Trier– as his moody, violent, arthouse-style horror-drama films have only won the ‘Pissing the MPAA Off Awards’ rather than Academy Award-winning accolades.  His latest shocker will be no different. Continue reading