Blumhouse’s HALLOWEEN (2018) manages to make Michael Myers scary again, while serving as a love letter to final girls/women everywhere (Spoiler-free)

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Nick Castle reprises his role as The Shape in 2018’s Halloween. (Universal)

Two years ago when frequent collaborators Danny McBride and David Gordon Green announced that they were joining forces again for a Halloween franchise sequel, I squealed.  With Green’s indie-film roots combined with McBride’s dark sense of harsh humor, I felt pretty confident that their vision for a modern-day Halloween sequel would fill a void in the hearts of the franchise’s fans everywhere that craved a worthy sequel, after the countless corny and painful-to-watch ones that have notoriously tainted the Halloween franchise over the years (I’m looking especially at you, “Halloween: Resurrection”.)  However…after months and months of numerous media clickbait articles about the production of the upcoming film, with headlines that contained quotes from McBride and Jamie Lee Curtis proclaiming that this movie was “legitimately scary,” a lackluster trailer release in June, and just the annoyance of straight-up over-saturation of the film’s highly anticipated release, I grew worried.  After all, when the people who are behind a film can not stop talking about it to the press, that typically leads to disappointment and disaster. I thought, Who actually says that their own movie is ‘scary’?! Just let the damn movie speak for itself!  But now that I’ve caught one of the upcoming film’s earliest screenings at Salem Horror Fest, I can thankfully say that I was wrong for worrying so much.  Aside from a few nitpicky flaws, David Gordon Green’s Halloween is solid.

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Horror Master John Carpenter’s Anthology Live Tour 😱

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John Carpenter and his band performing to a sold out show in Philadelphia for his Anthology tour

On Saturday, November 18th- (I’m late posting this, too busy stuffing my face with Thanksgiving food and all)- I had the opportunity to check out horror god John Carpenter’s Anthology Tour, where he and his band performed some of his best musical scores from his famous films, as well as his own solo compositions that are not featured (but should be!) in any major motion picture or project.   Continue reading