The Devil to Make Her Do It: THE BLACKCOAT’S DAUGHTER & Depictions of Satan and Women in Horror (Originally published for Bloody-Disgusting.com)

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The original article can be found at Bloody-Digusting.com.

This article contains spoilers.

For as far back as the genre’s inception, horror has been pinning its protagonists against the biggest baddy, seducer of sin, and purveyor of evil within existence: Satan. Whether he’s looking to claim an earthly human body or he’s manipulating characters into doing his “work,” horror has been fascinated with the Devil for decades— but especially in regards to his relationships with women and female characters.

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How Ari Aster Embraces Horror Conventions to Create His Own Unique Contributions to the Genre (Originally Published for Bloody Disgusting)

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The original article can be found at Bloody-Disgusting.com.

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This decade gifted us a plethora of auteur filmmakers that brought something completely fresh to the horror genre, while still managing to derive influence from beloved classics of the past— Jennifer Kent, Issa Lopez, Robert Eggers, Jordan Peele— to name a few. But there’s one creator in particular who has excited myself and many others to next-level degrees with his assuredly eccentric, provocative, ballsy filmmaking style: Ari Aster.   

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A Love Letter to Great Indie Horror: THE HOUSE OF THE DEVIL Turns 10 (Originally published for Bloody-Disgusting.com)

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The original post can be found at Bloody-Disgusting.com under “featured editorials.” 

2009 big-budget studio horror was chock-full of lifeless remakes, satirical horror-comedies, and even emerging fresh takes on zombie movies, but slow-burn, ‘80s-inspired nostalgia— which we now see in droves— was never really on the slate…that is, until the masterful combo of a little slasher/Satanic cult/haunted house indie called The House of the Devil came along.

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TIGERS ARE NOT AFRAID and the Justified Inclusion of Child Violence within Horror Films (Originally Published for Bloody-Disgusting.com)

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(Original post can be found at Bloody-Disgusting.com. This editorial contains spoilers for Tigers Are Not AfraidIt Chapter TwoThe Nightingale, and The House That Jack Built.)

Issa Lopez’s poignant and revelatory Tigers Are Not Afraid has made such an impact on the horror genre because it differs from so many others films that are given to us: its narrative is told through perspectives that we never see enough of in mainstream cinema; its fantastical elements often add to the film’s sense of peril, as opposed to solely bringing the characters comfort; and, most interestingly, it contains a fearlessness to incorporate grim (but necessary) portrayals of child violence into its storytelling.

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MIDSOMMAR solidifies Ari Aster as a contemporary master of bizarro horror

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There is a handful of contemporary auteur filmmakers that are bringing something completely fresh to the horror genre, while still managing to derive influence from classics of the past– Jennifer Kent, Robert Eggers, Jordan Peele– to name a few.  But none have excited me quite to the degree of the eccentric, strange, provocative, ballsy filmmaking style that Hereditary (and now Midsommar) creator Ari Aster possesses.

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10 of the Most Unsettling Moments in Doll Horror (Originally published for Bloody-Disgusting.com)

The original post can be found under “Editorials” at Bloody-Disgusting.com.

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There is a very specific reason why I asked my mother to return the many porcelain dolls she bought for me when I was a kid: I watched too many horror movies. Porcelain dolls, baby dolls, life-size dolls, and especially ventriloquist dummies: I had seen far too many of those damn things open their eyes, come to life, and kill people in movies, and I wanted no parts of it.

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In Fabric Review- Overlook Film Festival (originally published for NightmarishingConjurings.com)

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The original post can be found here.

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Kill, couture, kill!  You’ve got an evil-spirited dress wreaking havoc upon all those who encounter it, pitch-black humor about consumerism, demented kill scenes, Peter Strickland’s direction, and an A24 distribution.  IN FABRIC is the British horror-comedy that we didn’t know we needed.

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