TINGLE MONSTERS is much more than the first-ever ASMR horror film (Originally published for Nightmarish Conjurings)

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The original post can be found at NightmarishConjurings.com under “Reviews.”

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The first-ever ASMR horror film, aptly titled TINGLE MONSTERS, is upon us— but this effective 10-minute short film from writer/director/star Alexandra Serio has much more on its mind than auditory relaxation triggers.

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Best Horror Films of 2018 (many of which you probably missed)

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A recent, laughable Vogue article (because clearly they are experts in horror films) got it all wrong a couple months back, when they complained that the horror genre was dead-in-the-water this year.  On the contrary, 2018 has been one of the best years for the genre yet, which brought us many harrowing, immersive looks inside disturbing family trauma narratives, women and men seeking revenge, secretive serial killers, and a haunting coven of witches, just to name a few.  If you missed a few of these because you were bombarded by the all-consuming Halloween (2018) and A Quiet Place press coverage this year, catch up on these quieter greats before the year is up.  Many of these were not seen nor talked about nearly enough as they deserved to be.  2018 has been exceptionally good to us.

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‘Searching’ is a captivating thriller about getting lost in the sauce of the digital age (Originally published for Nightmarish Conjurings)

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John Cho plays a father searching for clues on his daughter’s laptop in her disappearance in Searching (Sony Pictures)

Who knows the real you better— your parents, or your Instagram/Facebook/Twitter followers?

A captivating social thriller about familial relations and the underbellies of the Internet age, Aneesh Chaganty’s Sundance winner Searching tells the story of David Kim (helmed by an impressive and completely relatable performance by John Cho) and his sometimes-distant teenage daughter, Margot, who fails to return home after a night out at a study group. When a concerned David begins to panic and files a missing persons report, Detective Vick (played by a sometimes awkward Debra Messing) is assigned to the case, and suggests that David should hop on Margot’s laptop— in order to contact her possible friends and acquaintances, as well as to view her recent website browser visits, in order to gather possible evidence of her whereabouts. As the film’s tagline cleverly hints at, David will never be able to find his daughter until he understands who she truly was in the first place.

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