TINGLE MONSTERS is much more than the first-ever ASMR horror film (Originally published for Nightmarish Conjurings)

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The original post can be found at NightmarishConjurings.com under “Reviews.”

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The first-ever ASMR horror film, aptly titled TINGLE MONSTERS, is upon us— but this effective 10-minute short film from writer/director/star Alexandra Serio has much more on its mind than auditory relaxation triggers.

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Short film #EatPretty tackles social media expectations, female perfection, & eating disorders (Originally published for NightmarishConjurings.com)

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Original post can be found under “Short film” archive on NightmarishConjurings.com

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(Courtesy of Random Acts)

An obvious criticism of any major social media site (especially Instagram) is its overflowing amount of unrealistic portrayals of perfection— especially for women. From edited and photoshopped pictures of women with “perfect” bodies to endless ads for “self-care” products that wind up serving as cash grabs based on feminine insecurities, we all arguably have succumbed to the pressure of making ourselves appear better in order to keep up with the Joneses (aka our fellow social media users). What we don’t realize, however, is how much social media and/or outward appearances and smiles can cover something far more sinister and sadder than just a filter-covered blemish on a picture. Rebecca Culverhouse’s unique art-horror short, #EATPRETTY may not drum up any traditional horror scares— but it will certainly make you contemplate and mule over exactly what the hell you just watched.

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‘Pinki’ Short Film Review (Originally Published for NightmarishConjurings.com)

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Original review posted under “Short Film Reviews” on NightmarishConjurings.com

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(Panic Fest)

Do you ever sit and wonder what exactly happened to your very first Nokia cell phone from the early 2000s? Or reminisce about where exactly your old cassette player went, when you moved out of your family home? In a 21st century world, in which our computers have been upgraded into laptops, our MySpace accounts upgraded to Instagram profiles, our VHS tapes have become Netflix streaming, and our MP3 players have turned into Spotify apps, technology has become a significant marker into the various chapters of our lives. As we struggle to keep up with the various updates of the techy items that are supposed to make our lives increasingly easier, we often forget about the simpler, outdated items that no longer serve us purpose— even though they may hold years of cherished memories for us.

In Spike Hyunsuk Kim’s charming short film PINKI— which was recently shown at Kansas City’s Panic Fest— these questions about our old pieces of technology that we have since moved on from are begging to be asked.

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‘Stalk’ Short Film Review (Originally Published for NightmarishConjurings.com)

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Original review posted in “Short Film reviews” over at NightmarishConjurings.com

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(Horror House Media)

After releasing their effective short film Soundbite last year, director Michael Coulombe and writer Brantley J. Brown are back with another short entitled STALK, which serves as a horror hybrid that draws influence from some of your favorite classics.

We open with a title card that draws inspiration from Stephen King’s novel IT, (and Stranger Things too) containing bold, blood-red font, which brings upon the feeling that we are about to be transported into an iconic ‘80s slasher.

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Horror short ‘Soundbite’ will give you the creeps next time you’re home alone with your laptop (originally published for Nightmarish Conjurings)

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(Horror House Media)

Eli Roth has said many times: “If you don’t want to be scared during a horror film, don’t close your eyes— close your ears.”

SOUNDBITE— the four-minute short for the new “Horror House” YouTube channel, from director Michael Coulombe and his co-writer Brantley J. Brown— makes effective use of auditory tension to create an afflicting horror short that will cause actual gasps by its climax.

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