Short film #EatPretty tackles social media expectations, female perfection, & eating disorders (Originally published for NightmarishConjurings.com)

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Original post can be found under “Short film” archive on NightmarishConjurings.com

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(Courtesy of Random Acts)

An obvious criticism of any major social media site (especially Instagram) is its overflowing amount of unrealistic portrayals of perfection— especially for women. From edited and photoshopped pictures of women with “perfect” bodies to endless ads for “self-care” products that wind up serving as cash grabs based on feminine insecurities, we all arguably have succumbed to the pressure of making ourselves appear better in order to keep up with the Joneses (aka our fellow social media users). What we don’t realize, however, is how much social media and/or outward appearances and smiles can cover something far more sinister and sadder than just a filter-covered blemish on a picture. Rebecca Culverhouse’s unique art-horror short, #EATPRETTY may not drum up any traditional horror scares— but it will certainly make you contemplate and mule over exactly what the hell you just watched.

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‘Searching’ is a captivating thriller about getting lost in the sauce of the digital age (Originally published for Nightmarish Conjurings)

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John Cho plays a father searching for clues on his daughter’s laptop in her disappearance in Searching (Sony Pictures)

Who knows the real you better— your parents, or your Instagram/Facebook/Twitter followers?

A captivating social thriller about familial relations and the underbellies of the Internet age, Aneesh Chaganty’s Sundance winner Searching tells the story of David Kim (helmed by an impressive and completely relatable performance by John Cho) and his sometimes-distant teenage daughter, Margot, who fails to return home after a night out at a study group. When a concerned David begins to panic and files a missing persons report, Detective Vick (played by a sometimes awkward Debra Messing) is assigned to the case, and suggests that David should hop on Margot’s laptop— in order to contact her possible friends and acquaintances, as well as to view her recent website browser visits, in order to gather possible evidence of her whereabouts. As the film’s tagline cleverly hints at, David will never be able to find his daughter until he understands who she truly was in the first place.

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